240,000 people in major markets suffer from systemic sclerosis

Systemic sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune disease which may lead to devastating symptoms. Everyday tasks are hindered, and the patient’s quality of life is significantly decreased.

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Our drug candidates

Gesynta Pharma’s drug candidates utilize a unique mechanism of action to reduce inflammation and pain, and increase healthy blood flow. We are currently developing three drug candidates. One of the compounds has reached clinical phase IIa stage. A second one will start clinical testings in 2022. Read more about our drug development projects.

Therapeutic areas

Understanding microvascular dysfunction

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Development pipeline

GS-248 - our most advanced drug candidate

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About us

A well-composed team with vast experience

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Development pipeline

Unique treatments of chronic inflammation

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Development pipeline

Our current activities

Gesynta Pharma bases its R&D on research from the Karolinska Institutet. The most advanced drug candidate, GS-248, reduces inflammation and increases blood flow in the microvasculature, thereby aiming to provide improved treatments for several serious diseases. In an ongoing clinical  phase IIa study, GS-248 is being evaluated for its potential to normalize vascular blood flow and reduce pain in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic sclerosis. Positive results from this study may lead to a rapid broadening of the development program towards additional indications, for example cardiovascular and rheumatic diseases.

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Learn more about Gesynta Pharma

Gesynta Pharma bases its R&D on groundbreaking research from the Karolinska Institutet.

Our reputable board holds vast experience in drug development, commercialization and company scale-up.

Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease hallmarked by chronic inflammation in the body’s smallest blood vessels.

Half of systemic sclerosis patients develop difficult-to-heal digital ulcers, hampering many everyday activities.

Raynaud’s phenomenon affects most systemic sclerosis patients. It is often the first sign of the disease.

Our lead drug candidate GS-248 is currently under evaluation in a phase 2 study.